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Author Topic: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'  (Read 15058 times)

andrewh

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #25 on: September 18, 2008, 01:08:09 PM »

Glen

Thanx for the update, and when appropriate "Welcome to the new 4th mate" and real congrratulations to the mother!

Boat looks great!  Rudder too!
You can safely make a mould from it in papie mache if you just cover it with cling filn/kitchen film/whatever you wrap sandwiches with in Oz  (I know that you wrap them in Australians, but before that)   I use cling film to make hulls from plugs like this  - that's how Volante got made.

You logic and powers of deduction are impeccable - you can run all servos on 4.8V and the vastest majority on 6V too (four disposable batteries or 5 NimH) (if interested most are reasonably happy, if a bit lethargic, at 3.5 V as well).   I hesitate to suggest reading the fine manual, but normally the box or leaflet give speed/power/torque at both 4.8V and 6V.  Lots more power at 6v, lots more current drawn - some of my servos are terribly jittery with 6V.

What servos did you get?  And is it one for the rudder, one for the sails?

Great antipodean planker - I have studied at your feet and have this to offer as a specimen


We look forward to your updates as and when they happen - as you say time evaporates with an infant in the house

regards
andrew
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Glen Howard

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #26 on: September 23, 2008, 01:01:09 AM »

Is this the fabled PT Boat hull? She's looking very sharp - will you fill that section with a carved solid balsa block? Or have you another crafty trick up your sleeve? What scale is she going to be?

For Lialeeta I am running a drum winch servo and a rudder servo on a two-channel system. They are both Hi Tec parts, sold to me by someone I trust absolutely when it comes to all things boat parts. The whole circuit is still a bit of a mystery to me yet, but will get hold of the appropriate battery and then I'm sure it will all come together. Or not. In which case you'll be hearing from me here.
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andrewh

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #27 on: September 24, 2008, 09:08:16 PM »

Fabled?
I would go with notorious - The bow is now filled with block glued in with PU glue and now it is tidied up it looks quite convincing
scale is 1/32 - so figures this scale or 1/35 should be available

Hitec is good stuff - they make no losers (IMHO) - keep us posted when you can - one advantage of sleeplessness is that you can nip inot the build area and glue in three bits in quiet moments.

andrew
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Glen Howard

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #28 on: September 28, 2008, 08:14:30 AM »

Speaking of figures, I have been trying to order some from George Turner models (a UK company). I sent them two emails and have never heard back from them. Are they still in existence???

I've hit a major snag with Lialeeta. Turns out the drum servo doesn't fit in the hull space available. No matter which way I site the servo, it pops out above deck level. I cannot get a clean run for both the servo wheel and the control lines. This is obviously a bit of a blow - and I suppose it's the price you pay for buying bits as you go.

Not quite sure how to proceed from here. My options are:
1) abandon the project and never speak of it again. (tempting)
2) abandon the project and start again in a larger scale (not sure I have the spirit for a second go)
3) fit the deck at the height of the gunwhales, instead of at the planned deck height - this would buy me an additional 20mm of height below decks and would solve the servo problem.

I'm probably leaning toward option 3 - though it means I can't build the boat I had in mind. It means I would just build a ship with clean decks (ie. no detailing), and write her off as a learning experience on a journey to greater things.

Dunno. Of course I'm always willing to hear ideas from this learned forum.

I think I need counselling....


 
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tigertiger

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #29 on: September 28, 2008, 08:36:44 AM »

Hi Glen

If you look at JayDee's bluenose, I think he has his drum inside one of the deck houses/cabins. The sheet then runs out through a hole in the deck housing. There after it runs across the top of the deck, like many other types of competitiion yacht.

You will find the Bluenose on here, but the info about the winches is on Jaydee's Website I think.

You could try a PM to him.

I think this would work for you.
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Glen Howard

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #30 on: September 28, 2008, 12:27:05 PM »

Couldn't find details on his website, but you've broken the log-jam in my mind and inspired me to go on. I can mount the drum servo under the main hatch, run the sheets out of a hole/s in the hatch coaming to the desired place via a series of sheaves along the deck.  As you say, like a racing yacht. It's so crazy it just might work!

Gawd bless ya TT.

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JayDee

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #31 on: September 28, 2008, 05:47:57 PM »

Hello Glen,

The attached drawing show how the sheets are set up on my Schooner.
I too thought they were shown on my website !!.
If there are ANY sheets under the deck, which are hard to reach THEY will be the ones to give you trouble.
Seen folk near to tears trying to fix thing under decks, not to be recommended ! !.

John.  ;)
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amdaylight

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #32 on: September 29, 2008, 03:03:01 AM »

Glenn,

You have picked a pretty vessel to build.  O0 O0 One quick question, where did you get the plans from, this is one that I think that I want to put in the to be built queue.

Andre
over here in Portland Oregon
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andrewh

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #33 on: September 29, 2008, 10:07:57 AM »

Glen,

You are in the best hands with the winch layout and advice, etc. 
For various reasons I did not read this thread for several days but would have proposed the same solution to your winch issue - Volante has two winches mounted about deck level with their drums in the deck house and (at least initially) the strings above deck running round homemade turnaround pulleys.

As a thought, but not a preferred option, winches can be laid horizontally, so that the drum works vertically if that helps with the space.  ( the drum will always be winding a closed loop, so this layout can work OK)

Surprised you have not had response fron George Turner (when you posted) ; I have always had swift response and superb service by phone and email.  Possibly he has had several shows and allowed a backlog to build.  If there is anything I can do at this end, like phoning, or relaying your enquiry, just let me know.

Best wishes with family and ketch

andrew
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JayDee

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #34 on: September 29, 2008, 10:46:59 AM »


Hello Andrew,

Engineers of the World united  !!!

John.  O0
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Glen Howard

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #35 on: September 29, 2008, 12:15:14 PM »

Thanks all for your thoughts on this quandary of mine.

John - thank you so much for your sketches here, that is extremely useful to me. It confirms the picture I had in my head after TT's post. Just one thing - can you clarify for me, when you talk about 'top lid' and 'bottom lid', are you talking about a special box you make to house the winch drum, or are you referring to the cabin fitting under which you have mounted the servo? Or something else, perhaps? (your Bluenose is magnificent, by the way. No other word for her).

Andre in Oregon - hi there, yes, she is a lovely looking boat. I'm pleased that the lines of the hull are shaping up like they are supposed to (so far!). The plans can be bought online from a Melbourne-based company called Float-A-Boat - http://www.floataboat.com.au/. Just have a look through their plans catalogue on the website. I also know that the Tasmanian Maritime Museum (http://www.maritimetas.org/) have plans for sale of a sister ship of Lialeeta, the May Queen. I've inspected these, they are very similar to the set I have with one important difference: May Queen still exists, and I have about 50 photos of her that I'd be happy to share with you. They are proving invaluable with my current project.

Andrew - I did try the servo from all angles without any luck. My plan was always to hide the running rigging beneath the deck, but I am happily disabused of this notion now! I'm even more puzzled about GT models after your comment. P'raps I'll give him a call.

(No sign of the new third mate as yet - though judging by the size of its mother, shouldn't be long now).
 
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dave301bounty

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #36 on: October 07, 2008, 07:55:38 PM »

Hi, this is a double of the ketch   Enid   this does the whitsunday classic sailing on the northern tip of Aussie ,my son has just come back from a fasinating trip ,.well done to you in your build , re Dave ,.
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Glen Howard

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #37 on: October 08, 2008, 01:07:57 PM »

Yes, was up there myself recently and saw those ketches - had the very same thought.
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Glen Howard

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #38 on: October 28, 2008, 12:07:05 PM »

First things first - our baby boy was finally born on the 18th of this month. Both he and his mum are doing well, and our home is fuller and busier than it has ever been.   :-)

Just as importantly (at least in this forum), in the lead up to the birth, and the subsequent time off work, I have actually managed to move Lialeeta forward.

Very briefly, I've finished the deck (1mm ply, planking drawn on with a black ballpoint pen, stained with mahogany and varnished - not yet mounted), mounted the rudder and winch servos (and I think managed to make a reasonable fist of JayDee's box - see pics), installed the stanchions that will eventually be planked and become bulwarks (I'll have to fit the deck first, or I strongly suspect it won't go on past the bulwarks), made and installed chain plates from brass rods, cut the mast steps from aluminium tubing and cut the masts themselves (these are from strong, straight Tasmanian Oak Dowel - seemed apprpriate on this vessel), and cut the bowsprit and fitted it with my own brass hand-made mastbands to hold the stays and bobstays.

All up I'm feeling very satisfied with myself. I'm ready to fit the deck, paint the hull, build cabins and hatches and then start rigging her up.

Just wanted to refer a few things to this august forum.

1. As you'll see from above, the winch servo and running rigging will be sited above the decks, not below as I had orginally envisioned. I've searched the forum but not really been enlightened on the subject of tackle for running rigging.
- I know I can buy working brass blocks, though they are pricey-ish. Are they worth it?
- Some people seem to use conduit tubing from garden watering systems and such - doesn't strike me as an above-deck solution...?
At this stage I am planning to use brass eyelets, screwed into the timber frames, to run the sheets around the deck. Does this sound workable? Other ideas?

2. Water-proofing the hull at the deck join seems tricky. I've decided to run a bead of clear bathroom silicone around the join, then screw the deck down to the hull frames on top of the silicone. That should do the trick, right?

3. The hull is wooden planking, filled here and there with car-body filler. For the painting process I'm thinking:
- coat of fibreglass resin (I dunno...seems like a good idea for strength and water-proofing)
- couple of coats of primer
- 3 top coats of enamel spray paint

Your advice and ideas on issues at 1, 2 and/or 3 most welcome.

And that's where I'm up to. I'll pop a few pics on for you to see how she's looking too.

all for now, Glen

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amdaylight

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #39 on: October 28, 2008, 07:02:43 PM »

1. As you'll see from above, the winch servo and running rigging will be sited above the decks, not below as I had originally envisioned. I've searched the forum but not really been enlightened on the subject of tackle for running rigging.
- I know I can buy working brass blocks, though they are pricey-ish. Are they worth it?


Yes, I would use the working blocks as a nonworking solution will cause the line to fray and eventually break(usually at the worst possible moment  >>:-().

- Some people seem to use conduit tubing from garden watering systems and such - doesn't strike me as an above-deck solution...?
At this stage I am planning to use brass eyelets, screwed into the timber frames, to run the sheets around the deck. Does this sound workable? Other ideas?


Yes it sounds like it would work it just may not look right or properly finished, if it was my model I would wait a couple of weeks till I could afford the proper fittings so it not only worked right but looked right on display.

2. Waterproofing the hull at the deck join seems tricky. I've decided to run a bead of clear bathroom silicone around the join, then screw the deck down to the hull frames on top of the silicone. That should do the trick, right?

Yes it would, but since this is a sailing model and you will not need to get into the hull spaces I would glue the deck to the frame with epoxy, as a sailing model it may have one or the other of the rails in the water as it heels over. Since all of your servos will be either in a deck house or under a deck house there is no real need to have the main deck removable.

3. The hull is wooden planking, filled here and there with car-body filler. For the painting process I'm thinking:
- coat of fiberglass resin (I dunno...seems like a good idea for strength and waterproofing)
- couple of coats of primer
- 3 top coats of enamel spray paint


I would also put a coat of resin on the inside of the hull to prevent water from soaking into the wood from the inside, if the planking gets wet either from the outside or the inside it will still expand and eventually crack the outer finish. I also coat the underside of the deck before I glue it in place just so there is no raw wood there either .
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andrewh

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #40 on: October 29, 2008, 09:52:31 AM »

Glen,
Glad to hear your news and view your industry

Welcome to your new son, and congratulations to all of you, especially your wife :}

I have finally caught on - the "ketches" you are speaking of are a kind of rig.  I had thought it was the result of australian fishing expeditions ;-}

Great work on Lialeeta - you have been a busy and successful boy!
You have good answers already - my modest contribution is

. As you'll see from above, the winch servo and running rigging will be sited above the decks, not below as I had orginally envisioned. I've searched the forum but not really been enlightened on the subject of tackle for running rigging.
- I know I can buy working brass blocks, though they are pricey-ish. Are they worth it?
- Some people seem to use conduit tubing from garden watering systems and such - doesn't strike me as an above-deck solution...?
At this stage I am planning to use brass eyelets, screwed into the timber frames, to run the sheets around the deck. Does this sound workable? Other ideas?

The winch will drive one or more closed loops - these need to be turned round somewhere.  The ideal is a working pulley, preferably in a scale-like material and construction.  The minimum is a brass screw-eye with the loop cord running through it!
I wouldn't go for eyelets - they are sharp one side and will eventually fray the cord.  Given the universality of Murphy's law guess where the boat will be at that moment :}. (will it be upwind with a calm sea?)
I would (modestly) suggest that however you plan to finally run the running rigging; first use a working (simple) layout to get experience and iron out the challenges.  If you are feeling very sensible making a jig out of scrap that mimics the full-size layout will add to your self-confidence.
I made a big brig rig jig to do this - it convinced me!  (BTW I had a 1-turn winch which produces a travel of 4 inches (100mm))





Fwiw for Volante I am splitting the difference and making two pulleys using my kitchen-table methods and I expect them to pass muster for function and appearance.
I will sketch and post them later - alter materials, techniques to suit your stock bin and skill set

I realise I am assuming a closed loop from the winch drum with your sheets attached to the sides of the loop.  It is possible (but not enormously easy to get different travels for various sheets)  Much simpler to accept same travel on all sheets, and adjust the point of sheeting (esp on the booms)  to work with that travel!


2. Water-proofing the hull at the deck join seems tricky. I've decided to run a bead of clear bathroom silicone around the join, then screw the deck down to the hull frames on top of the silicone. That should do the trick, right?

Yes, that will do the trick.  as amdaylight says you will seldom have to go under the deck again - but this way you would be able to (at least in theory)

3. The hull is wooden planking, filled here and there with car-body filler. For the painting process I'm thinking:
- coat of fibreglass resin (I dunno...seems like a good idea for strength and water-proofing)
- couple of coats of primer
- 3 top coats of enamel spray paint

Good thinking,  - nowt wrong with that, and the suggestion of dolloping resin on the inside is good, too.  In any case after a sail you were planning to remove hatches and give her a good airing, werent you?

Keep up the great work, as and when; and keep us posted
andrew



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Glen Howard

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #41 on: October 30, 2008, 11:29:18 PM »

Oops, to clarify, I actually meant screw-eyes, not eyelets. The more I reflect, the more I am inclined to go with screw eyes. I realise that they won't look scale, but then I'm not aiming for full detailed scale finish to display standard. I'm really interested in something a bit more straightforward than that, that will sail well and look good on the water. I'm taking inspiration from a yawl at my club which took a similar approach and looks great under sail. So I have some small screw eyes that I've primed and finished in black so they don't stand out too much.

As to running rigging - I'm not planning to use a closed loop, but rather just sheets that wind on and off the drum - if you know what I mean. All sheets will travel the same length, again for simplicity's sake (though I like the idea of fixing to different parts of the boom to adjust travel, thanks Andrew). There is a part of me that is toying with fixed foresails - that is, set up to travel on a horse, but not actually rigged onto the winch. I wonder whether this is possible or desirable?  Just thinking out loud...

amdaylight - thanks so much for your thoughts. I've now thoroughly coated the inside with resin. Ain't no water gettin' in or outta there, I can tell ya. I painted the underside of the deck with timber sealer, as I thought resin would crack when it came time to fit the deck, due to the high degree of sheer. I'm going to go with plan (a) and use silicone, but only because I had already bought some. I guess I was just testing the water in case anyone said 'Silcone!!! Whetever you do DON'T USE SILICONE!'. Which happily didn't happen  :-).

Andrew - what can I say? "big brig rig jig" - you're a genius. I'd be interested to see some more detail on the way you've fitted topmasts there, as it's something I'm thinking about at the moment too. Was thinking of making a wooden platform (maintop?) similar to what you have there, or maybe even attempting something from brass tubing. Dunno. Also, how have you fixed your bowsprit? I've screwed mine onto the actual deck, but I'm worried that it still won't bear the load. I might fix it onto the stem as well, I'd like to hear what others have done.

anyway plenty to be going on with. Until next time.
 
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tigertiger

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #42 on: November 02, 2008, 11:42:12 AM »

Hi Glen

Congrats on the new shipmate.

The model is coming on great guns and really taking shape nicely.

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andrewh

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #43 on: November 13, 2008, 05:23:24 PM »

Glen,

Sorry about delay, but you were no doubt changing a nappy anyway

With a sail winch I believe you need either a closed loop OR elastic tensioners to avoid the dreaded buggle round the drum - right out in the tasman sea as well.

The  winch needs a little tension kept on the line it is winding - I have seen this done with fishermans pole elastic - just to keep a light tension on the line.  JayDee has wound more sheets on his drums that politicians tell "statements of variable accuracy"

My "tops" I did like full size.  Trestle trees were cut from 1/8 ply including the cheeks which fit aslongside the mast, and the cross trees coffee stirrers.  The Top is 1/32 ply with drawn planks.  Where scale and I part is that I have screwed the trestle trees to the lower masts through the cheeks of the trestletree (I needed screweyes there anyway for the braces :})
The mast cap is a bit of satsuma ply (salvaged from orange boxes) with a square hole for the top of the lower mast.   
Top mast is also retained by a screw - very fine self-tapper salvaged out of dismantled computer drives
Couple of pics - let me know if you would like to see anything specific

foretop

maintop with gaff

One of the topmast doublings - not complete - the trees are missing

andrew

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Glen Howard

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #44 on: February 26, 2009, 11:43:12 AM »

Well after being inundated by literally two personal messages, it's high time I updated this build. I have been watching in great distress as Lialeeta fell further and further down the MM leaderboard.

You will be pleased to know that despite my recent silence and the best efforts of my demanding children, I have actually been getting some building done. Lialeeta is a lot further advanced and things are steaming (sailing?) ahead at a rate of knots.

Since last I updated, I've:

- fitted the deck and screwed it down - using silcone as planned. I would give anything to be able take back the moment I decided to screw the deck down with countersunk screws - the heads detract from the deck finish terribly. But what's done is done, and at least the fitting is strong and should be watertight. Please be nice and don't mention it again.

- planked the bulwarks - easily the most straightforward job of the build to date, and maybe the first thing that went more or less as I had planned. I've filled the gaps on these with car filler in preparation for painting.

- fitted bulwark capping. this was exactly as fiddly and irritating as I had anticipated it would be. I had planned to use ply for this but that was beyond my poor skills and tools, so in the end I used 1mm styrene sheet (I absolutely love working with that stuff). I turned the hull upside down and traced the shape directly onto card, from which I was easily able to make templates and then the capping itself. It has taken a bit of filing and sanding and and cursing and sweating, but the finished rails will do the job.

- fitted coamings over the three deck access hatches. Again I just used styrene sheet (1.5 mm this time) sealed on with two-part epoxy resin for strength. I find that for a snug fit nothing beats measuring parts directly off the hatchway itself.

- fitted the boards and wheel over the transom. This was a piece I had prebuilt and then glued on. If you look at the photos you'll see there is a little 'jump up' along the rail height at the stern here. This is not on the original vessel, but that was the extra height I needed to get the boards and wheel over the steering push-rod, which sits above the deck. All up it's not ideal, but nonetheless I'm pretty happy with the way it has gone so far.

- built and fitted the aft cabin. For me this is fun stuff, putting fittings together and making them look convincing. This is built from styrene (walls) and stained ply (roof). The portholes are commercial ones - and I came across a top tip elsewhere in this forum for glazing - simply lie the portholes on plastic wrap, fill them with PVA and let them dry - voila! Great looking glass windows. The planking on the cabin walls was scored on with a modelling knife. I've had to leave a big ugly hole for the steering push rod to pass through, as the servo sits under this cabin - you can clearly see this on one photo. Not ideal, but it works.

- bult a main hatch cover. The plans call for boards and a centreboard windlass. In the interests of ease and robustness, I've chosen to delete the windlass altogether and make a tarpaulin instead. Nothing I could say here would improve on Mark's Mary J Ward build where he sets out in typically thorough and clear detail a method for making a very effective tarp cover. What is more he is more than happy to coach one on one when you get stuck! Historical note - older ships would have had brown tarps (as does Lialeeta), newer ships green ones (apparently). As the running rigging will come out the side of this hatch from the winch, a slot has been left in the appropriate place. The hole through the coaming is a fair way up the side, which I'm hoping will keep things dry below wen decks are awash.

- built a cuddy for'ard from styrene sheeting, same sort of method as the aft cabin, though with a curved styrene roof.

I have also built the masts and topmasts, though I will go into more detail on these when they are a bit further along and I can take some decent photos of them.

The next thing I have to do I have been putting off for ages, and that is sorting out the drop keel. If you look above you will see that I did make a brass keel and bulb, but with time and experience and discussions with old salts at my club, I now realise this is laughably inadequate for the task at hand. So I have procured a 300mm sheet of brass, and am going to cut out a new keel of a sensible length from that. I'll be able to attach the bulb I've already made, and (hopefully) make a fitting that will bolt snugly into the keel-box in the hull. I'm then going to glue thin sheets of polystyrene to the brass so I can shape an aerofoil, which I'll finish in fibreglass matting and resin for strength. I'll be sure and take photos of that process and post them for your interest (assuming it works, which btw I'm not).

My next task will be to paint the hull and then - for the first time - I'll get her in the water and see how she sits.

I'm visiting my sail maker at the weekend to see how that job is coming along - again, more details when I have more to tell.

So that's me - I think we'll make some leaps and bounds from here, what with painting, water testing and rigging her up. So be sure to watch this space for more updates.

Glen
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andrewh

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #45 on: February 26, 2009, 12:51:23 PM »

Glen,

You have quietly worked wonders down there! 
Thanks for the update and the pictures - we like what you show us :-))

Certainly I won't mention the Csk screws (other than to say that if you replaced them with brass woodscrews they would be invisible in a few weeks as the patina happens)

You are not very far from sailing - at least the test floats - you have been building your ketch under a bushel.

There is just one point I must take exception to - not least cos you are a teecher :}
You have spelled Voila (sic) correctly
On the  web, and in emails there are three words which must be spelled incorrectly:
Viola!
guage
flourescent
At least I have never seen the last two spelled in any other way :}

Worry not about the keel - you will get it right and it will probably not be crucial. 
If you were nearer I would offer you a keel blank of 316L stainless 
Don't bother with fairing the keel sides until you have made tests and sorted out the right length, weight and position - you may have to make some adjustments and the styrene might make it more challenging.

Good building, parenting and teeching :}
andrew
"Galvanised to finish the unfinished, explore the unknown and revisit the very basic in my 61st year"
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Glen Howard

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #46 on: April 24, 2009, 12:17:30 PM »

This will be brief as the internet just ate my longer response. I know, I know, I should have learned this lesson by now...

I have a few things to update you on.

Firstly the problem of the keel, which you will recall was exercising me.

I have taken a rather unorthodox approach,  though it seems to work. You may recall that I had cut a piece of brass plate for the drop-keel which fit snugly into a slot cut into the keel, but it was too small for the job. I had a piece of marine ply left over form something else which was a good size for the job, so I trimmed it up and cut a notch into the top of it, into which the brass plate is bolted. Then the whole is fixed into the keel slot and ta da! Job done.

It is a large drop-keel (I was conscious of the large sail area Lialeeta will have that will need to be balanced off), and may yet present problems with steering, but we’ll duck under that bridge when we come to it. 

A picture will tell the other 813 words.
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Glen Howard

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #47 on: April 24, 2009, 12:21:48 PM »

And here is a picture of the keel fitted in place, so you’ll really see what I was driving at.
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Glen Howard

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #48 on: April 24, 2009, 12:35:10 PM »

Ok, as you will have guessed from the last pic, I've now painted the hull - white over red oxide seems to be pretty standard for these ketches. I did have a rather ill-advised experiment with painting the rubbing strake green (green??) but it looked dreadful so I un-greened it quick smart.

Not sure what I can add to the collective wisdom on painting. Couple of things that may be of interest:
• I painted her in high gloss enamel car spray paint, finished with a few coats of satin varnish to take the shine off
• When masking up I used foil and masking tape – that is a huge improvement on trying to do the job with newspaper and masking tape
• Because my time is at a premium these days, I found I was leaving days and days between applying coats, which has lead to a much better finish. Normally I rush painting, as I’m impatient to see the result, but the result is better if you can leave it alone for a while.

I also did the name decals using those fabulous vinyl stick-on letters from BECC, sealed with varnish. I haven’t used these before, they are brilliant. They look great, are easy to use and not too pricey.

I also bought some BECC vinyl strips to make up the boot topping (?) above the red oxide. Once again, I can recommend this as an approach for a great result to anyone who is considering trying to get a fine even line using tape and spray paint (big mistake - voice of experience).

These photos show Lialeeta on her first time in the water (the neighbour’s pool). I was very happy with her trim, though she needs a little ballasting forward. There was some minor leakage around the keel box which I’ve addressed with silicone. But all up I thought she sat very prettily indeed. Not bad considering the total absence of science in the drop-keel and lead weight.
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Glen Howard

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Re: Tasmanian Trading Ketch 'Lialeeta'
« Reply #49 on: April 24, 2009, 12:36:19 PM »

and another one
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