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Author Topic: Binnacle and Telegraph  (Read 7262 times)

Bunkerbarge

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Re: Binnacle and Telegraph
« Reply #25 on: March 20, 2008, 06:05:49 PM »

Here's another one the "other" way round.
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Bryan Young

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Re: Binnacle and Telegraph
« Reply #26 on: March 26, 2008, 04:58:22 PM »

Please be very careful when fitting E/R telegraphs to a very old ship. Some of them had the "visible" dial horizontal with the handwheel on the side....a bit like the RN rev. counters they had until at least the late 1960's. One turn of the wheel would change the dial from "a" to "b" setting. On a twin screw ship this was very helpful to the "driver" as he could stand between them and control the relative engine movements without going through the malarkey of swinging a big handle. All depended on the E/R reactions of course, but pre 1920 this type was pretty common on ships that did a lot of manouvering. BY.
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Notes from a simple seaman

barryfoote

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Re: Binnacle and Telegraph
« Reply #27 on: March 29, 2008, 04:19:58 PM »

Many thanks to Bunkerbarge for his photos. I have now done one of the telegraphs and you can see the result....I am quite pleased for a first effort, but if anyone can advise on getting it better, I am all ears...

Barry
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Bunkerbarge

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Re: Binnacle and Telegraph
« Reply #28 on: April 03, 2008, 12:06:10 AM »

Brilliant Barry, that really looks the part.  I'm glad I could be of some help.
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barryfoote

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Re: Binnacle and Telegraph
« Reply #29 on: April 03, 2008, 07:35:14 AM »

Brilliant Barry, that really looks the part.  I'm glad I could be of some help.

Cheers. You really saved the day there. Have now aged the telegraph a little as I was not too happy with the shade of "Brass". Udes a little thinned down matt black and a cloth. Looks much better now.

Barry
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Dave Buckingham

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Re: Binnacle and Telegraph
« Reply #30 on: April 03, 2008, 07:48:24 AM »

In days of old when I was an apprentice it was a dayly job to polish the telegraphs.

Port and stbd double ones for twin screw also P & S docking telegraphs to pass the order fore and aft

See you on the 20th
Dave
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andygh

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Re: Binnacle and Telegraph
« Reply #31 on: April 03, 2008, 11:53:51 AM »

Quote
Like I said, unless anyone has a plan that shows otherwise, I will follow all the evidence I have collected.

As Bluebird has suggested I was led to believe that such steering arrangements required two men and unless the 35 years of experience included a trip on this particular vessel I will follow the plans.

Sorry Bunkerbarge, I may be a bit dim but are you implying that yours is designed to be steered by 2 men?
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farrow

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Re: Binnacle and Telegraph
« Reply #32 on: May 20, 2008, 10:37:16 PM »

T o answer Bluebirds query. I have sailed on some old scows in my time, the MoD had loads. My experience was that on large helms you stood on the side and the binnacle is always forward of the wheel, but close enough for the helmsman to clearly read. The open bridge was used when in rivers etc for pilotage reasons and a nice sunny day when the OOW wants a change, otherwise you always used the lower bridge for sea passage I can remember this from my days on the St Margarets built 1943 and hardly altered on her bridge layout for her entire life. It would be the same with tugs, when on a job the old man has her on top, when running light the mate had her in the lower bridge. Also I expect Bunkerbarge has his model right, as it was a period of change, modern ships with smaller wheels you stand behind and steer, now a lot of modern ships do not have steering wheels, you sit at a desk with a horse shoe shaped thing.
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farrow

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Re: Binnacle and Telegraph
« Reply #33 on: May 21, 2008, 09:27:49 PM »

Bunkerbarge,
You are spot on right, I have several ships plans of a similiar age to your vessel and they are laid out the same. Should imagine it is a left over from sailing vessels when the gear is behind the wheel and men stood at the side of the wheel !
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farrow

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Re: Binnacle and Telegraph
« Reply #34 on: May 29, 2008, 08:32:50 PM »

Hi Bunkerbarge, don't let them wind you up, I have some builders plans from that period and your model is 1005 correct and very nice it looks. My experience is most seaman with medium to large wheels stand at the side and we are talking of period when ship tech was still evolving from sailing vessels and thier traditional build and fit to vessels.
David
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andygh

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Re: Binnacle and Telegraph
« Reply #35 on: May 30, 2008, 10:44:16 AM »

So it's not "designed" to be steered by 2 men, just a throwback to older vessels?
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Bunkerbarge

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Re: Binnacle and Telegraph
« Reply #36 on: May 31, 2008, 07:47:21 AM »

I don't think we are trying to say how the arrangement is best operated, the original issue came about because it was said that the configuration of my model was wrong.

Since my return home I have been through my reference books and was actually surprised at how many of the plans for vessels of this period in the C.V. Waine books have this arrangement, including of course the plans of my own ship.

I think this is a classic case of an instance where an open minded discussion would have been more productive than an ill informed and subsequently wrong sweeping statement that only led to confusion of the person who asked the question in the first place.

As to how they were operated I am happy to be guided by someone who has experience of such an arrangement but in the meantime I am quite confident that my model is in fact correct.  My own personal interpretation is that this arrangement is not only a throwback to the sailing vessel set up but it is also possibly an easier and therefore much cheaper system to manufacture.  I am sure the wheel could be operated from either the side or the front with suitable access to the binacle in calmer weather and if more effort was required in heavier swells then it would probably have been a two man operation anyway.

Interestingly enough of course the arrangement of the wheel house equipment is the same as the flying bridge.

Thanks for the support and comments rmasmaster much appreciated.
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barryfoote

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Re: Binnacle and Telegraph
« Reply #37 on: May 31, 2008, 07:59:08 AM »

I think this is a classic case of an instance where an open minded discussion would have been more productive than an ill informed and subsequently wrong sweeping statement that only led to confusion of the person who asked the question in the first place.

You are quite right Bunkerbarge....Confusion reined......having said that I did some more research and I am quite convinced you are right. Sorry for all the stick you got over such a simple matter, but it all adds to the spice of life....Cheers,

Barry
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Bunkerbarge

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Re: Binnacle and Telegraph
« Reply #38 on: May 31, 2008, 09:05:48 AM »

Just glad I could help at the end of the day Barry.  If you have any other questions feel free to ask them.
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andygh

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Re: Binnacle and Telegraph
« Reply #39 on: May 31, 2008, 10:19:28 AM »

Quote
I don't think we are trying to say how the arrangement is best operated

OK but surely "form follows function"  :-\
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