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Author Topic: steamy windows  (Read 2406 times)

sunnybob

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steamy windows
« on: March 19, 2008, 04:55:22 PM »

I'm about to fit some mahogany half round beading rubbing strips around my cruiser. Most of it as near flat as makes no difference, and holds very little worries for me.

But there are two bow strips that have a substantial curve to them. The arc increases the closer it gets to the bow.
When I watched my dear old dad make this boat 40 years ago, I know he steamed the planking to get it into the curves, but exactly how, and how much steam to use, I do not remember.

Advice please? O0 O0 I dont want them to spring off in a months time :embarrassed:
Thanks.
Bob
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boatmadman

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Re: steamy windows
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2008, 05:03:07 PM »

Make a jig that represents the curve of the hull, soak the wood thoroughly in hot water and bend into the jig. Leave and allow to dry naturally for a couple of days, remove, it will open out a little but should be close to the curve required.

You may need to use an intermediate jig before getting the final curve.

I would try on a test peice first.

Ian
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sunnybob

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Re: steamy windows
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2008, 08:05:05 PM »

Just soak? I recall steaming the kitchen up for days when dad built the boat. :D

and soak for how long please?

Bob
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boatmadman

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Re: steamy windows
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2008, 12:24:55 AM »

I have found that soaking is ok for modelling timbers, I beleive that steaming is needed for full size timbers to get the moisture right through the wood.

I have boiled a pressure cooker full of water and steamed wood in the past, but it takes longer unless you can get something big enough to hold the entire peice of wood.

Soaking, I usually soak for up to 30 mins, then test the wood and soak and test until I get the bend needed - trial and error really.

Ian
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sunnybob

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Re: steamy windows
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2008, 03:33:51 PM »

Ta muchly, now I gotta go shoo the wife away from the cooker >>:-( >>:-(
Bob
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bigH

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Re: steamy windows
« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2008, 04:25:17 PM »

   Bob,  there are a number of ways to steam wood, most ofthem are on the forum somewhere.   One of the easiest I have found is to get a long pece of large iron drainpipe, cap one end, and place the spout of a large kettle into the other.   Keep the kettle full, the water boiling and after a few hrs, take the wood out place it in a jig  built to the required shape and pull to shape.    DON'T FORGET TO WEAR GLOVES          all the best  BigH
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Guy Bagley

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Re: steamy windows
« Reply #6 on: March 20, 2008, 05:21:16 PM »

tesco's do a 3 tier vegetable steamer for under a tenner,  if your timber will fit into it then  job done
 the timber for my launch fits perfectly- pour in water,switch it on, set the time on the timer and sit back and relax ! - so long as your timber fits inside and they are not 3 feet long then its the easiest way - just  fit timber to former and steam away, max time is 40 mins on the timer  but you can always steam it for 2 or 3 sessions-
 its worked well for me
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sunnybob

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Re: steamy windows
« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2008, 07:01:14 PM »

well, my pieces of wood are too long for a steamer.
and I dont have any steel drainpipe (nor even plastic come to that).
but someone said to just heat, and I DO have an old black and decker paint stripper (like a hair dryer, but you wouldnt want this baby anywhere near your head :embarrassed: :embarrassed:)
So I've just tried this blow heater, and it works pretty dam well  ;D ;D :D.

I've got a jig, so will strap the moulding to the jig, heat like billy-oh, and then retire with a glass of red to await cool down.
Result! O0 O0 O0
I'll let you know how I get on in a few days (I'm off to ride me bike now  :D :D)

Bob
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tigertiger

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Re: steamy windows
« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2008, 12:56:52 AM »

I have seen it done on telly on a large scale.

Build a simple wooden box that can open at one end.
Use a steam wallpaper stripper and find a way to plug it into the middle of the box.

Put wood in and close the box. Steam up and wait.

The box on the telly show was about 3m long i think.
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sunnybob

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Re: steamy windows
« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2008, 03:44:30 PM »

well I'm back from riding me bike (mud, crud, rain, and even hailstones at one point today as I'm riding hilly windy country roads >>:-( >>:-( >>:-(), and Ive got the beading strapped to a former and heated it well with the old paint stripper gun. Just waiting for it to cool now.

I tried it on a piece of scrap yesterday, just pushing one end against a wall and heating. It works very well!! That piece is still curved nicely, after sitting untethered for over 24 hours.

More news tomorrow, after another bike ride (hopefully this time without the weather histrionics) O0 O0

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tigertiger

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Re: steamy windows
« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2008, 02:13:59 AM »

well I'm back from riding me bike (mud, crud, rain, and even hailstones at one point today as I'm riding hilly windy country roads >>:-( >>:-( >>:-(), and Ive got the beading strapped to a former and heated it well with the old paint stripper gun. Just waiting for it to cool now.


Is heating another method of bending wood?
Or has the wood been soaked for several days first?

The steaming thing I understand as it gets moisture rapidly into the wood cells, making them softer and more flexible. But I do not understand the use of a heat gun.

Can somebody enlighten me please?

Ignorantly yours
TT
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sunnybob

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Re: steamy windows
« Reply #11 on: March 22, 2008, 05:06:08 PM »

I've been dry heating the mouldings, while applying pressure to bend the wood into shape.
Its working very well. The wood is discolouring, so its no good if you want the wood finish, but if its being painted, its a very quick, and very tidy way to get shapes. O0 O0
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