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Author Topic: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise  (Read 24395 times)

Tugwilson

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #50 on: June 05, 2010, 04:42:23 PM »

Hi Paratrooper.
                think this is the link to my video.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ra7inbeMKX0

let me know what you think.

Tug
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Paratrooper

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #51 on: June 05, 2010, 06:31:06 PM »

Hi Paratrooper.
                think this is the link to my video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ra7inbeMKX0

let me know what you think.

Tug

Tug, I posted a comment on You Tube.  I think this is great for a shake down cruise.  The wind lines might be a hassle because of the trees and land, but over all I think this is great!
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Tugwilson

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #52 on: June 05, 2010, 06:56:50 PM »

from the head man tall ships that is i take your comment very kindly.
The lake is on the New Forest where I live and is well known for it's changeable indifferent winds.
Once i get to where i know I can trust both the electronics and the Weatherly ness of her I'll try the Solent. which happens to be it's original sailing ground.
They use to lay up in the Solent by the Isle-of-White commonly called "The White" which you will read in many of the books.
My next task is going to be to get three of her cannons to fire live and I’m looking at the options that are on this forum and others
pity were so far apart, would love to visit and maybe sail together. but not sure it could make it over to yours that pond is rather longer than my batteries would last....lol

regards Tug
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Perkasaman2

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #53 on: June 05, 2010, 08:44:04 PM »

Hi PT, The frigates were 'the eyes of the fleet'. Their role  can be compared with that of destroyers in the WW2 period, although carronades could give them huge firepower in 'close action'. I enjoyed a  couple of weeks around  Boston  and enjoyed  a marvellous day in the Charlestown Museum. (I'm not surprised that the Constitution shares this site with a preserved WW2 Fletcher class Destroyer.) Fantastic exhibits, especially the dry dock.  :-))   
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Paratrooper

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #54 on: June 05, 2010, 09:22:17 PM »

Hi PT, The frigates were 'the eyes of the fleet'. Their role  can be compared with that of destroyers in the WW2 period, although carronades could give them huge firepower in 'close action'. I enjoyed a  couple of weeks around  Boston  and enjoyed  a marvellous day in the Charlestown Museum. (I'm not surprised that the Constitution shares this site with a preserved WW2 Fletcher class Destroyer.) Fantastic exhibits, especially the dry dock.  :-))   

Yes sire, I spent some leave there when I was at Ft. Devons for a spell.  I made several parachute operations there with some of the SAS as well as the ASAS--great soldiers.  I was very intregued with the exhibits at Charlestown as well.  One book I have speaks of the larger frigates as cruisers while those of the class of Surprise were indeed eyes of the fleet.  I suspect the different classes were no doubt meant for specific actions but like all navies they were used out of role at times.  I would have guessed without knowing that the brigs would fill the role similar to a destroyer--depending on their size of course. 
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JerryTodd

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Bigga Boats
« Reply #55 on: June 05, 2010, 09:26:28 PM »

            Tugwilson - do you have a build log or a site?  I wanna see more!

            The plans for Macedonian came in 1:48, and I was, and still am, tempted to do her in that scale instead of 1:35.

            At 1:36, Constellation is
            • Beam: 14-1/4" (36.195 cm)
            • Length over the rig: 96" (243.84 cm)
            • Width over the rig: 36" (91.44 cm) ~ Main yard, stuns'l will increase width if used.
            • Length on deck: 61" (154.94 cm)
            • Length between perpendiculars: 59-1/8" (150.178 cm)
            • Draft Without ballast keel): 7" (17.78 cm) With 3-1/2" ballast keel: 10-1/2" (27.94 cm)
            • Height bottom of keel to main truck Without ballast keel): 65" (165.1 cm) With ballast keel): 69" (175.26 cm)
            • Sail Area: 2,807.01 square inches in 17 sails (19.5 sf, 18,109.7 scm, 1.8 sqm)
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Tugwilson

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #56 on: June 06, 2010, 05:29:39 AM »

your past the hull stage so heres the rigging ect.,

















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Paratrooper

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #57 on: June 06, 2010, 01:41:55 PM »

Tug, do you have some sort of motor attachement for your model?  I watched the video again and I thought I could see some action at the rudder in several areas. 

The rigging on your ship is very nicely done.  Finding figures in 1:48 seems a whole lot easier than finding some more suitable figures in 1:24 scale.  Are you using winch servos to operate the braces? 
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JerryTodd

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #58 on: June 06, 2010, 03:21:08 PM »

Yeah Tug, we're all builders here, we wanna see the guts - show us the greasy, grindy bits!  ;)
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Tugwilson

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #59 on: June 06, 2010, 08:30:25 PM »

the guts of the model has 4 winches, 2 pumps and one single operated servo.
Winches 1 & 2 run reefing of sails and jib.


winch 3 is for raising and lowering the main ancher.



winch 4 is sail movement port and starboard.



to assist in steering there is one pump with two outlets at the stern which pumps water past the rudder when it is moved either side. This is to assist in turning.

Finally my get out of trouble card is a small motor attached to the extension keel with a deflector shield to once again assist in direction.





the final pump has a flout attached in the bilge to remove any water that enters.
The system runs on 40.875 MHz 6 channel Tx, Rx with Action Electronics to control everything.

Tug
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Paratrooper

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #60 on: June 06, 2010, 09:31:44 PM »

Captain Tug--this is intreguing and most ingenious.  Good on ya mate! 
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Paratrooper

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #61 on: July 02, 2010, 01:23:15 AM »

Shhipmates--in case any of you are interested, this Surprise kit is on eBay and it is priced very nicely if someone wants to tackle the ship. 

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=130405598984&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT

RG
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Tugwilson

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #62 on: July 02, 2010, 06:17:49 AM »

Hi Para, puts the value of ours into perspective. I'm in UK but even with curency conversion thats still a lot of money.
looks like your going to have an addition to the fleet over there soon......well some time next year...or the year after that.
I wish him luck who ever it is that purchases this one.

best wishes to our cousins over the pond
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Jimmy James

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #63 on: July 04, 2010, 06:54:51 PM »

Nice looking model.... As a Historical note ... British Frigates almost never set a sail on the Crojack (Mizzen) yard    It tends to interfere with the Driver   which is an important maneuvering sail. However the French, Spanish, Danish and occ. Americans did set a Mizzen Course... But in the Americans case at least this was only set as a passage sail on long hauls and was not usualy part if the working sail bag
 :-))
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JerryTodd

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« Reply #64 on: July 04, 2010, 07:05:13 PM »

The only one I saw in this thread with a sail there was a brig (Killingworth) A main course, in fact makes it a brig and not a brigantine - it's not a cross-jack.
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Jimmy James

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #65 on: July 05, 2010, 11:11:10 PM »

Jerry
 A Brigantine is Square rigged on the Fore-mast and Fore & Aft rigged on the main-mast.. {:-{.A Brig is Square rigged on both the main & the fore mast, However the main sail on a brig is a large Gaff sail set on the lower after side of the main mast.... The lower yard on the mainmast of a Royal Naval Brig (and most Merchant Navy Brigs)Was known as the crojack yard and almost never had a sail set on it  Because it interfired with the setting of the Gaff main sail ( Which on a brig is by far the largest sail on the vessel  {:-{ unlike the Driver (Gaff mizzen)on a ship rigged Frigate which was mainly a manovering sail and was smaller than the main course
Freebooter
Jimmy James.. Master "Sail"
 :-))
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JerryTodd

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #66 on: July 05, 2010, 11:45:02 PM »

I am terribly sorry, but you are mistaken sir.  In the "Napoleonic period" A true brig has a square main course and a fore-n-aft spanker.  Take off the course and it was considered a brigantine.  What we refer to today as a brigantine was then known as a hermaphrodite (or jack-"a$$") brig - a combination of brig and schooner.  Only ships have cross-jacks.

By 1810 and later, most brigs of war were actually rigged as Snows with a snow mast right aft of the main with the driver set on it. As it allowed the gaff driver to be hooped without requiring the main mast to be smooth.  Thus freed, the main could made in pieces and not requiring a single tree.

Today we often use the term "brig" as a catch-all for brigs, snows, brigantines, and hermaphrodite brigs.  Hermaphrodite brigs are now known as brigantines cause hermaphrodite is a pain in the jack-a$$ brig to write and say..

Here's the recreated BRIG Niagara which is technically, a snow.
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Tugwilson

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #67 on: July 06, 2010, 07:10:08 AM »

having read the last two entries, I shall now go and lay in a darkend room for an hour or two. ... {-)
as my head hurts. O0
but well done to you both, it's nice that we can have these discusions without bloodshead. or am i being too presumptuous

Tug
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RaaArtyGunner

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #68 on: July 06, 2010, 07:43:07 AM »


Are the cannons loaded  %) {-)
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JerryTodd

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"Throw him in the brig!"
« Reply #69 on: July 06, 2010, 01:15:09 PM »

I guess this would be the MAYHEM part.
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malcolmfrary

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #70 on: July 06, 2010, 05:46:21 PM »

Several Surprises (well...2 Surprises, 3 Surprizes)
Good link on
http://www.ageofnelson.org/MichaelPhillips/liste.php?char=S#2145
 for anybody looking for RN wooden walls history 1750-1850.  Some of the ship storys make both Hornblower and Bolitho sound a bit commonplace.  There was some tough guys back then.
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Tugwilson

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #71 on: July 06, 2010, 06:32:15 PM »

well done Malcolme, you quite right and the one we most hear of it my type Ex- L'unite info as listed :

SURPRISE  (24)  The French L'UNITE taken by Capt. T.F. FREEMANTLE in INCONSTANT in the Mediterranean on 20 April 1796.
Sold in 1802. 
 
  •Capt. Edward HAMILTON, 12/1797, Jamaica.
•On 4 October 1799 the French schooner NANCY was captured near Cape de la Vela. She was bound for Curacao with coffee from Aux Cayes.
The Dutch privateer schooner LAME DUCK of 10 guns was cut out from the harbour of Aruba on 15 October, Mr John BUSEY, acting lieutenant, was killed.
A Spanish schooner, MANUEL, was destroyed near Porto Cavallo on the 20th.
•On 25 October Capt. HAMILTON attacked and cut out from Porto Cavallo the HERMIONE (32) which had been handed over to the Spanish by her mutinous crew at La Guira on 22 September 1797.
•In spite of 200 pieces of cannon mounted in the batteries around the harbour, her boats, with 100 men including officers led by Capt. HAMILTON, attacked the HERMIONE at half past twelve in the morning, after beating off HERMIONE's launch, which carried a 24-pounder and twenty men, which was rowing guard around the frigate.
•The forecastle was taken by half the force without much resistance but on the quarter-deck and the main deck there was dreadful carnage before the enemy retreated to the 'tween decks where the fighting continued until the enemy's ammunition was exhausted.
In the meantime the rest of the men were cutting cables, making sail and towing the ship out of range of gun-shot from the shore to bring her alongside SURPRISE.
•Her captain, Don Romon de Chalas, said that she had been thoroughly repaired and was ready for sea with a ship's company of 321 officers and sailors, 56 soldiers and 15 artillery men. She mounted 44 guns.
•119 of the Spanish crew were killed and 228 prisoners, including 97 wounded, were landed at Porto Cavallo.
•Twelve people were wounded on SURPRISE including the captain.
The gunner, Mr John MAXWELL; quarter-master John Lewis MATHEWS; quarter gunner Arthur REED and Henry MILNE of the carpenter's crew were dangerously wounded, the rest only slightly.
Mr John M'MULLEN the surgeon volunteered to take part in the attack.
•Capt. HAMILTON brought his prize into Port Royal harbour at Jamaica on 1 November.
•The Receiver-General at Spanish Town, Jamaica, was ordered by the Assembly there to forward to the captain's agent the sum of three hundred guineas for the purchase of a sword in recognition.
•On 6 March 1800 the Court of Common Council at the Guildhall, London, resolved that Capt. HAMILTON should be presented with the freedom of the city with a gold box valued at fifty guineas.
•(Two of the mutineers were tried by court martial on 31 July. See HERMIONE.)
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Jimmy James

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Re: THis is why I like BIG RC sailing ships HMS Suprise
« Reply #72 on: July 10, 2010, 12:51:47 AM »

Ah!! Jerry
The American Love affair with the Snow, Quit a number were built as Privateer's and also Trading vessels  (and some were used as trading vessels {NE Coast Coal colliers}but it wasn't all that popular in Britain)
I am not aware  of any US Naval Snows but many small US war ships were built  in obscure places and that isn't really my major interest
The Royal Navy Having Picked up quite a few Snows as prizes evaluated the rig and found it nothing special,,,l thought  several of the prizes were purchased as stores ships and transports  but not war ships

I think we can agree to differ on some of the rigs as British rigs US rigs and European Rigs differ on the same class of vessel and many naming mystakes are common

Jimmy
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JerryTodd

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Constellation
« Reply #73 on: April 25, 2011, 04:00:56 PM »

Still plucking away
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