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Author Topic: Costa Concordia  (Read 95736 times)

malcolmfrary

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Re: Costa Concordia: Sinking and recovery?
« Reply #400 on: January 15, 2017, 04:03:36 PM »

Just read the Mail - he got 16 years for manslaughter, forget my question !    :-))

Mike
But he is under Italian law, he might not see the inside of gaol until all of the appeals and arguing have been settled.
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Martin [Admin]

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Re: Costa Concordia: Sinking and recovery?
« Reply #401 on: January 15, 2017, 04:17:18 PM »


How could a qualified & experienced  Captain be That overconfident?!
  >:-o


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francesco_Schettino#Legal_proceedings

On February 23, 2013, the office of the prosecution at Grosseto announced that it had initiated legal proceedings against Schettino. He was accused of multiple manslaughter, causing a maritime accident, abandoning ship with passengers still on board, and lack of cooperation with rescue operations.[23] In the spring of 2014 the trial started at Grosseto where the Teatro Moderno was transformed into a courtroom to handle lawyers of about 250 co-plaintiffs and about 400 scheduled witnesses.[19] While the other parties involved could plea bargain, Schettino's request to strike a plea bargain[19] was denied. By the time Schettino had his first appearance on December 2, 2014, he was left as the sole person to be accused of manslaughter.[24] "Schettino is (now) the only defendant, but he is not the only one responsible," opined Daniele Bocciolini, lawyer for some survivors. "He's not responsible for the lifeboats that couldn't be launched nor for the (failing) emergency generators".[25]

In his defence, Schettino explained that the sail-by salute was intended to pay homage to other mariners and, for business reasons, to present passengers a nice view. He denied that he did this to impress a Moldavian dancer whom he had brought to the bridge.[26] He indicated that his actions saved the lives of many after the ship hit an uncharted rock. Schettino accused some of his crew of misunderstanding and botching his orders. In 2013 he had already indicated that his helmsman, Jacob Rusli Bin, failed to follow his orders and made an error in changing the course of the ship.[15] Further, he blamed defective generators and flooding of compartments for aggravating the situation.[27] His lawyer indicated that it was these malfunctions that led to the fatalities, whereas Schettino did not kill anybody when the ship hit the rock.[24]

At the end of the proceeding, the public prosecutor Magistrate Maria Navarro asked for a jail sentence of 26 years and three months.[27] Confirming the charges, she parsed jail times as follows: 14 years for multiple manslaughter, nine years for causing a shipwreck, three years for abandoning the vessel and three months for failing to contact the authorities when the accident happened.[23] Navarro accused Schettino of lying during the trial as well as in public interviews prior to trial.[27][28] Prosecutor Stefano Pizza stated, "The captainís duty to be the last person off the ship is not just an obligation dictated by ancient maritime rules, it is also a legal obligation intended to limit the damage to those on the ship."[28]

Schettino's lawyers rebutted the charges and indicated that the disaster was a collective failure for which he should not be made the scapegoat.[16]

On February 11, 2015, after a 19-month trial, Judge Giovanni Puliatti read the verdict sentencing Schettino to 16 years in prison and five years of interdiction from navigating.[29][30] The 16-year verdict is composed of 10 years for manslaughter, five years for causing the shipwreck, and one year for abandoning his passengers.[16]
 
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derekwarner

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Re: Costa Concordia: Sinking and recovery?
« Reply #402 on: January 15, 2017, 09:39:50 PM »

The mercantile Insurance created in the Tea Rooms of London all those years ago  :o as what we generally know as Lloyds of London [or any similar group] may or may not play any part in these secondary proceedings.....

[Insurances  <*<....yep who will pay for all of this <*<?...you and me with our motor vehicle or home insurance being slugged?]

The publically quoted cost to remove the vessel exceeded the cost to build her, the loss of the profit that could have been generated by the vessel in her design life, the cost of all forms of Litigation ....[both Governmental and subsequent personal liability costs and damage claims for loss of life] 

Here is the publically listed detail of the Carnival Corporation......with assets and trading figures of these magnatutides it may just well be that Carnival carries it's own insurance [liabilities or and consequences]......

I certainly do not know the answer, however suspect that the operations provided by the Carnival Group may have been commercially uninsurable?

Derek

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Derek Warner

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Martin [Admin]

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Re: Costa Concordia
« Reply #403 on: May 12, 2017, 08:10:45 PM »

 
BBC:  Costa Concordia captain's sentence upheld by Italy court

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-39903968

Italy's highest court has upheld the 16-year jail sentence given to the captain of the Costa Concordia, which capsized in 2012 killing 32 people.

Francesco Schettino had handed himself in to the Rebibbia prison in Rome after the verdict, his lawyer said.

Schettino was sentenced in 2015 after a court found him guilty of manslaughter, causing a maritime accident and abandoning ship.

The cruise ship capsized after hitting rocks off the Tuscan island of Giglio.

Schettino was nicknamed "Captain Coward" by the media, after the coastguard released recordings of him in a lifeboat resisting orders to return to the stricken vessel.

Prosecutors say he steered too close to the island to show off to a dancer, Domnica Cemortan, who was with him at the helm.

But he blamed communication problems with the Indonesian helmsman.

The court ruling was welcomed by a lawyer representing relatives of the victims, who said it represented justice at last.

The sentence included 10 years for manslaughter, five for causing the shipwreck, one for abandoning the ship before passengers and crew were clear, and one month for lying to the authorities afterwards.

Costa Crociere, the company that owned the ship, sidestepped potential criminal charges in 2013 by agreeing to pay a Ä1m ($1.1m; £769,000) fine.

Five of Schettino's colleagues were also jailed for up to three years in earlier cases.
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ballastanksian

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Re: Costa Concordia: Sinking and recovery?
« Reply #404 on: May 12, 2017, 10:36:31 PM »

Excellent news. Small comfort to the families of the deceased I know, but all the same, that is one situation the coward couldn't escape from.
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roycv

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Re: Costa Concordia
« Reply #405 on: May 13, 2017, 12:04:59 AM »

I agree it was a needless accident.
From the technical point of view this was a very modern ship but it had reverted in design to a conventional propeller.
 If this had been an azimuth drive propulsion system I was thinking it might have been a lot worse as it would pivot on the much lower propellers and may have turned over.  Any comments on that?

On the other hand the ship may not have been sailed that close to land anyway with the extra draft needed.
Am I right in saying that Carnival do not commission azimuth drive ships any more?  I seem to remember reading something like this.
On the insurance side I think some 'Names' from Lloyds insurance may have taken a big hit.
regards Roy
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tony52

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Re: Costa Concordia
« Reply #406 on: July 11, 2017, 10:02:40 PM »

Some interesting photographs inside the wreck by photographer, Johnathon Danko Kielkowski. He couldn't get a permit and swam to the vessel in the dark with camera gear etc towed in a rubber dingy.

https://www.dpreview.com/articles/9389171227/haunting-photos-from-inside-the-wrecked-cruise-ship-costa-concordia





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Martin [Admin]

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Re: Costa Concordia
« Reply #407 on: August 18, 2019, 10:55:14 PM »


The dismantling of Costa Concordia


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Martin [Admin]

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Re: Costa Concordia
« Reply #408 on: July 03, 2020, 05:01:00 PM »


Intersecting Facts About the Costa Concordia sinking



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roycv

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Re: Costa Concordia
« Reply #409 on: July 03, 2020, 07:39:31 PM »

Commentators, do not seem to have grasped the differences between Gross tonnage and displacement yet.

 I recall the Titanic displaced 46,000 tons.  CC at a guess was probably 50000 tons displacement, maybe a little more, difficult to compare with different design considerations.  More power being required for the extensive air conditioning in the modern ship.  But cleaner lines (less space) required for Titanic to travel comfortably in the N. Atlantic.

But in reality not much difference in dispacement between them obviously modern materials mainly aluminium in the s/s have enabled a larger ship to be constructed.

 But one is a cruise ship and the other a liner, the latter needs stronger bows for the rough N.Atlantic.  The original hull designated for Q.V. ended up a different ship then another hull was designated to be Q.V.,strengthened and redesigned with an extra 5000 tons of steel in the bow section to enable her to safely cross the N. Atlantic in the winter.

There are pictures of the Queen Victoria crossing the Atlantic, just glad I was not on board!  They were taken when travelling with a much safer riding QM2.  I have travelled in a sister ship Queen Elizabeth at 20 knots into a 50 knot gale headwind, she was quite stable but the seas were not like the N.Atlantic.  Nobody was allowed on deck, everything was tied down as well.

regards
Roy
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Colin Bishop

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Re: Costa Concordia
« Reply #410 on: July 03, 2020, 07:58:05 PM »

Spot on Roy. The old ships had to devote far more space to boilers, engines and machinery so gross tonnage was much less. Today's cruise ships are more efficiently built and draw less water to enable them to get into cruise ports that the older deep draughted ships could never have managed. We have crossed the Atlantic on QM2 which is far bigger that the old Queens but the old Queen Mary actually displaced more that the QM2, 80,000 tons against 76,000 tons.

Colin
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