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Author Topic: Humber smack circa 1880- build log  (Read 54897 times)

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #150 on: July 02, 2014, 11:52:28 AM »

  In p151 it shows how I omitted detail, the trestletree itself is made of one piece suitable morticed to go around the cheeks. In reality this sat on the top of the cheeks and then extra timber was added to the top to form the bolsters for the shroud lines. The trestletree itself was a bit of a mare to cut, 4 attempts and 3 failures when I was cutting the hole for the foot of the upper mast. The timber kept splitting along its grain, I managed eventually.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #151 on: July 02, 2014, 11:55:52 AM »

 On to p152. The trestletree is wrapped in a 3inch by 1/4in iron band, I cut some brass sheet to the correct dimensions and bent it to profile then as shown in p153 epoxied it to the trestletree. P154 and p155 are angles showing the top mast slotted in to check for alignment.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #152 on: July 02, 2014, 11:58:01 AM »

Now we get down to truly fiddly little parts, p157 are eye plates to go on either side of the cheeks, bent up from brass and drilled for fixing pins. These are in place in p158 along with the brass band on the trestletree, all now fixed with dressmakers pins, these are ideal for bolt heads at this scale.

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #153 on: July 02, 2014, 12:02:03 PM »

 P159 and p160 show the eyebolts and the main halyard block crane. The crane was made up with stainless wire and silver soldered where the legs join, it was then epoxied into the mast.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #154 on: July 02, 2014, 12:05:45 PM »

Moving on to p161 I was looking for something to use as eyebolts with enough strength to take the forces of wind acting on them when sailing. I came up with these, looking through the many sections of our local ‘pound shop’ for inspiration I came up with fishing swivels. Cut the centre part away with sharp side cutters and it leaves the two ends. These are ready twisted and made of a strong wire, ideal, it saved having to make them using round tipped pliers and ending up with several of different size and quality. You can see a couple of them epoxied into the mast in p162.


Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #155 on: July 02, 2014, 12:08:59 PM »

 P163 and p164 show the many bolt heads, eye bolts and the crane iron now finished in a matt black, some refer to this as the crance iron but technically this only refers to the fitting at the tip of the bowsprit. At the top of the mast in p165 is a side mounted shieve, this is for the mast rope for hauling up/down the top mast for winter fishing. The rope passes through the shieve and down to a second shieve cut into the centre of the top mast, this is often referred to as a heel rope, however heel ropes are only used for the outhaul of the bowsprit. P166 is just another gratuitous shot of the mast.
 

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #156 on: July 02, 2014, 12:11:11 PM »

Hi Brian


An alternative for eye bolts that works is to use cotter pins. I have used these successfully. Drilling pilot holes through the width of the spar/mast then gluing with CA, and snipping off the exposed end on the far side.
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Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #157 on: July 02, 2014, 12:12:14 PM »

 On to p167 and the heel of the top mast. Again this was turned to profile in my hand lathe ( power drill) from some square stock. You can see in this pic the Fid, this is the wooden dowel used to support the top mast on the trestletree. In my case I have used a length of piano wire thinking anything in wood this small was asking too much of it strengthwise for sailing. Then p168 is a side shot showing the centre mounted shieve for the mast rope, the lower part of the lowering mechanism for the top mast.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #158 on: July 02, 2014, 12:15:21 PM »

Hi Tiger, yes that was my first thought but living out in rural Spain I have to make do, however on our next trip to the city (60 miles away!) I am going to have a good search in the big diy outlet and get in anything like that which may be of use. Its amazing when you look at the shelves how you can envision a use for most things %%

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #159 on: July 02, 2014, 12:17:17 PM »

 Now the mast cap had to be assembled and put into place to allow further additions to the top mast, in p169 is the initial assembly. I have fashioned a band in brass and then silver soldered it to a piece of sheet brass. Then in p170 the second part of it a simple band to the diameter of the top mast done the same way. Then both of them wrapped in an outer brass band that was soft soldered in place, p171 shows the finished part in matt black paint and ready to be epoxied to the top of the main mast.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #160 on: July 02, 2014, 12:19:29 PM »

 On to some interesting stuff, I have had to make a start on some of the blocks as they are an integral part of the main mast. P172 I show some of the blocks I purchased from Modelling Timbers, thes are little works of art, a timber block and working brass shieve only 60 pence each. My first problem came with the main halyard block, itís a triple, the blocks are only available in single and doubles.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #161 on: July 02, 2014, 12:31:30 PM »

 My solution is shown in p173. I cut one side from a single block, removed the pin and freed the shieve. Taking a double block I pushed free the shieve pin and then lightly sanding the cut part of the single block to size I glued it to the double, then placed all three shieves back in to the now triple block with a new pin made from brass wire. The final job was to bend the shackle and glue it into the top of the triple block once I had drilled the holes with a micro drill and pin vice, p174. The final photo p175 shows the block hanging from the crane iron.

It's been a long update this week but the next one will be shorter we have family coming out to avail themselves of my -Boating lake  sorry swimming pool.So next time it will be main boom, bowsprit and a start on the mizzen, along with a couple of photos of the build so far.

 
 


 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #162 on: July 15, 2014, 06:09:43 PM »

 I met head on a major problem of my own making and haste this week. For some time I have been looking at the boat and thinking something doesnít look right. Moving to the mizzen mast and I finally got it. I had made the mizzen the same diameter as the main mast! Iíll get to that later but check it out in p176 and p177.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #163 on: July 15, 2014, 06:12:06 PM »

 Iíll show another two of the boat so far with p178 and p179, thatís four pics and I think you can see clearly that the mizzen looks wrong, too large a diameter and it has an incline to the stern and not to the bow! These pics show better the weathering effect overall, maybe not to some tastes but as I stated previously these were heavily worked boats and to my mind its wrong to display them any other way.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #164 on: July 15, 2014, 06:13:44 PM »

 OK I finished the blocks on the trestletree and yoke from the last instalment, these consist of both rope stropped and hooked blocks in photoís p180 and p181. The crosstree is in place, this caused me a few headaches. Tapering down a piece of oak and then a piece of lime and then an offcut of plain old pine board, none of them had the strength to take the flex that may be applied by the upper mast stays. They all snapped under the slightest flex. I thought of using a piece of piano wire of the correct diameter but securing it to the trestletree would require epoxy in a place it would be seen. I found the answer in a kebab skewer from the kitchen! Correct diameter it flexes and returns, and made of bamboo so a light sand and it took the woodstain as well-result! Lastly for this you can also see the lantern shackle now added to the top cap, simply made with a 2mm shieve and some brass wire.
 

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #165 on: July 15, 2014, 06:15:24 PM »

 Now on to finishing the main boom. Like the cheeks at the top of the main mast it carries two eyeplates at the heel end. These are in photo p182 again simply made as described in the trestletree/main mast post. In p183 you can better see their location close to the gooseneck, the upper part of the boom has a cleat, again one of my plastic ones fitted the job here.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #166 on: July 15, 2014, 06:16:41 PM »

 Then back to the other end of the boom and the shackle added for the attachment of the clew earing p184, p185. This again was formed from some stainless wire bent around round tipped pliers and squeezed to fit the two locating holes drilled in the boom. P186 are the two eyeplates now mounted port and starboard of the boom, securing in place again with dressmaking pin heads.  So apart from sanding off any excess ca and epoxy glue the boom is finished and ready for woodstain before weathering.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #167 on: July 15, 2014, 06:18:44 PM »

Next up is the bowsprit, the heel of which carries a shieve and is grooved along each side for a length of 8ft at 1 to 1 scale. I left the shieve out as I am rapidly running out of them and just have the groove to take the heel rope. The forward end is a simple affair, having a vertical groove for a shieve, this one I have added as it’s far more visible in the finished model, p187. On to the bowsprit is slotted a round traveller with a hook for the jibsail. This shown in p188, the open end of the traveller being silver soldered together and then cleaned up with a grinding stone in the dremel. Under the bowsprit is a length of thin brass strip to represent the iron rubbing strip of the real craft.

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #168 on: July 15, 2014, 06:20:04 PM »

 Once running rigging is added the outhaul comes up from below through the shieve and attaches to the traveller, the inhaul along the top of the bowsprit and again attaching to the traveller. So the final part to add is shown in p189 and this time correctly referred to as the crance iron. This is the band around the end of the bowsprit to take the bullseye for the top mast stay.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #169 on: July 15, 2014, 06:21:07 PM »

 Moving on to the mizzen mast and the first pic p190, illustrated how I got the mizzen wrong. I cut out the old mizzen no easy task as I had epoxied this into place. Cleaned up the resulting mess and then made up a new mast of the right diameter. In essence I had used 10mm dowel and it should have been 8mm tapering to 6mm. So p190 is the new mast in place with the correct forward Ďleaní and does look more in proportion now.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #170 on: July 15, 2014, 06:22:36 PM »

 Now down to the mizzen mast fittings, p191 more mast hoops ten of them this time, taking into account the smaller diameter mast I have used 10mm copper pipe to make them. You will notice a different coloured thread, I have used 20 mtrs of black thread on the main mast and five here. The only thread I have left in .020 thickness was this natural so I have used that and will paint it black. Then p192 shows them slotted on to the mizzen mast and painted, you can also see the beginnings of the smacks skipper in this photo, still a work in progress thatís why heís missing limbs!
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #171 on: July 15, 2014, 06:24:07 PM »

 On to the next photo p193, this is the hounds or in modern parlance the spider band. Again made with 10mm copper pipe I made up two side plates and a single tang so it had five lugs in all. This was silver soldered.  In p194 you see the next stage of the build, four rings added to four of the lugs and a double block added to the fifth. Unlike the main mast where the shrouds are conventionally looped around the mast, the mizzen shrouds are attached by shackles to these four rings, the double block is for hoisting aboard the aft end of the fish tackle.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #172 on: July 15, 2014, 06:26:52 PM »

 P195 is the hounds in place on the mast and painted and then in p196 is the full rig of the mizzen mast, from the top down we have :-
Topsail halyard shieve
Double block for mizzen staysail halyards
 Eye (unused) for standing end of topping lift
Single block for topping lift
Two singles for peak halyards
Mizzen crane with a double block for halyards
  Hounds as already described. So thatís it for now, next up the mizzen boom and gaff and the main gaff.
 

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #173 on: July 22, 2014, 02:29:30 PM »

Hi everyone not much to describe here, the mizzen boom has been completed and really it’s just more or less a copy of the main boom with much the same fittings p197 (the drawing underneath is not the boom!) The notable exception here are the reefing clamps shown in p198, instead of individual reefing clamps like the main boom, the mizzen has one long one on each side. Then p199 is the foot of the boom showing the cleat, gooseneck and eye plates made as already described.

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #174 on: July 22, 2014, 02:31:47 PM »

 Back to the drawing in p197, this is the main gaff and p200 shows the start of the build. The photo shows the thumb cleats underneath to which the wire spans that attach the peak halyards butt against. Above those is a strengthening wooden strip known as a fish batten (no idea why itís called this) The batten is bent (another nautical term for tying/fastening) to the gaff with rope in four places. Then on to p201 this is my template to make up the gaff jaws, the jaws themselves are two pieces of 2mm pine strip glued together so I have a 4mm thickness. The template will be copied to this glued piece for cutting out.
 
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