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Author Topic: Humber smack circa 1880- build log  (Read 54843 times)

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #75 on: April 09, 2014, 09:59:41 AM »




Once I was happy with the cuts I glued each piece direct to the A4 making sure to slightly straddle the line. With both port and starboard done and glued to the A4 I  repeated the process, so that in effect I had two courses of mahogany stripwood sandwiched together which gave extra strength. I left it overnight to set up and cut the strips free still attached to their paper backing. Turning them over the paper gave me an outer cutting line to follow on the bandsaw. Offering them up to the hull I was reasonably happy with the way they fitted on the outer edges, so some sanding and they were deemed fit for purpose, shown in p58.
I then took a pair of compasses and set the gap to 7mm then using the pointer along the outer edge I transferred this to the unfinished inner edge. This was then sanded down to the line and after many checks against the frame timbers and bulwarks I was happy with the outcome. The paper was sanded off the underside and each rail was then glued and pinned to the hull in p58/p59. The stern taff rail was completed slightly differently, as it was small I cut two pieces of the stripwood and glued them together at a shallow V angle  to take into account the curve of the rail. In this case they overlapped one over the other at the centre, once dry enough to handle I cut two more pieces and butt jointed them on opposite sides of the first two. This gave me a continuous double strength piece, once fully set they were offered up and the outer edge of the stern  was pencilled on to them. Once more cut on the bandsaw and sanded to final shape the compasses gave me the inner edge line.
As I said there must be an easier way but as this is the first sailing model I have made Iím happy with it.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #76 on: April 09, 2014, 10:05:22 AM »

 I also completed the forward windlass that I started previously. Again I used the tried and tested method cutting the pieces from timber and gluing them together, the two bitts and knees shown in p63. This however through a spanner in the works. It required two small sprockets for the pawls to fall into and also two larger ones that actually form the winding mechanism. Nowhere could I find on the internet anything suitable.
However while browsing around the local Merca China (this place is a goldmine of stuff if you have the time to spend) I came across a shelf of those kiddies toy cars, the ones you pull back and release and they trundle across the floor. I bought a couple for the grand sum of 4Ä got home and under the gaze of my wife disassembled them, the  body parts went in the bin, she walked off shaking her head, but I had 7 or 8 usable sprockets!
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #77 on: April 09, 2014, 10:07:06 AM »

 Then the problem raised its ugly head, I had completed the octagonal winding drum, I think I prefer the olde worlde eight quartered as a description! Building up the quarters around a piece of dowel. I attached the sprockets at each end ready to attach to the two bitts, the drum is shown in p61 and p62. The problem was the smaller sprocket on the winding shaft that engages the larger of the sprockets on the drum has gone missing. I couldnít find it anywhere, none of the other left overs were small enough so that meant another trip to the local town to buy another toy.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #78 on: April 09, 2014, 10:09:26 AM »

 P64 shows the winding drum attached to the bitts and p65 shoes the two brass bearing mounts for the drum shaft, these were simply made with some brass shim and forming with round nose pliers. Then we move on to p66, this is the winding shaft, complete with new small sprocket, notice the blood on the cutting mat? I was using a small diameter drill bit in an archimedes drill, looked up out of the window to see who was coming down the drive. The drill bit chose this moment to break through the other side and bury itself into my finger.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #79 on: April 09, 2014, 10:10:37 AM »

 This shows the steel shaft complete with its timber bearing mounts ready to attach to the bitts. Then finally for this piece we have p67 and p68, two views of the finished item, showing the bolt heads and the two shackles on each bit for the detachable winding handles. Also to be seen are two plastic cleats, the diagram in Marchís book shows just the one on the inner face of the cleat, but since I have plenty I stuck one on the rear face of the starboard cleat as well. So apart from some final tidying up with wet and dry this is ready for paint and mounting.

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #80 on: April 09, 2014, 10:14:06 AM »

 Lastly for this update we have p69, this is showing the partly completed mast blank in place on the hull for a test fitting, if you recall this was begun back in topic reply number 72. This is indeed made up from the 4 quarters of pine. I also formed at its base an octagonal section simply made by having drilled a 12mm hole through the centre of a 14mm square piece of pine. The blank was then glued through the hole, once the glue had dried the octagonal faces were scribed onto the blank and then sanded back and a slight taper from 12mm to 10mm sanded along the length of the mast. Done by turning it in a power drill while holding sandpaper around the shaft.
The build now goes into a hiatus for a month. We are returning to the UK and my MG which has been in the garage all winter now needs mot and tax and maybe even a trip back to Spain with us? However SWMBO insists I have to sell it, wonder who will win that exchange of opinions? So expect a new update around mid May.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #81 on: April 09, 2014, 11:17:53 AM »

Oh nearly forgot!

here is a photocopy taken from Edgar March's book, perhaps someone more knowledgeable than me can answer a couple of questions.

In the upper diagram can be seen arrowed (2 small arrows) a cavil rail, also lined in the lower diagram. This appears to span the gap between the port bitt and the bow post. Would this be correct? I've not seen such a set up on any of the black and white photo's I have, but they are not very clear.

Also in the top diagram is the forestay arrangement. It is anchored through the knee of the bitt with what appear to be lashings through a bullseye, how could this be tensioned should it be necessary? Then you have the way it passes through the bow post, I don't have a problem with the lower part as it has a nice curve to it, but the upper part shows the stay exiting the post at an acute angle, a point of extreme tension and liable to fray! In the lower diagram there is something marked 'score' on the bow post, could this in fact be a roller of some type for the stay to pass over?

Over to you gentlemen....

hammer

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #82 on: April 09, 2014, 04:03:03 PM »

Brian. This is my interpretation.
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hammer

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #83 on: April 10, 2014, 10:12:18 AM »

Brian the fore stay could be tensioned using the winch & a traveller, before fixing with the lanyard. Mine is a mess I am afraid, it is hat elastic so the stay remains taught.  I have no idea what the score is all about sorry. Hammer
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Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #84 on: April 10, 2014, 06:15:44 PM »

Thanks for the replies Hammer. You are a mine of useful information each time a prolem arises. On the plane in the morning so any forum bashing by me for a week or two will have to be done on my tablet, I'm more at home with a laptop!

hammer

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #85 on: April 11, 2014, 05:11:27 PM »

Before someone picks me up. A small rope used to pull a lager one is not a traveller but a messenger. It made me look in my library so checked on score, only thing I found was. The grove in the outside of a block where the holding rope rests. So must just be the exit hole in the stem.
Bring some sun with you. Hammer. 
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Netleyned

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #86 on: April 11, 2014, 05:20:04 PM »

Score.   Grove.    Groove

Seems to follow.

A lot of old shipwrights terms seem to change spelling slightly
as they were modernised.

Ned
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dlancast

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #87 on: April 14, 2014, 02:24:32 AM »

Awesome work Brian..... as real as it gets.  Really enjoying this build.
Fairwinds,
Dennis
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Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #88 on: April 17, 2014, 07:57:00 PM »

Awesome work Brian..... as real as it gets.  Really enjoying this build.
Fairwinds,
Dennis


Sorry Dennis but mine is simple and nowhere near the quality of work you have produced in your build. That square rigger is something to behold!


I've managed to borrow my sons laptop so back to posting! can't wait to return to Spain though, roll on the 7th May. On the bright side its meant I have now re-supplied all those little bits that you always seem to be missing when you need them!

Duncan

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #89 on: April 30, 2014, 07:43:30 PM »

Hi Brian

I just saw this youtube video of the Brixham trawler Leader and thought it may be of help to you as it shows her in detail. Link is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XIKcKi_De4k

Enjoying the great progress you are making, Duncan
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Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #90 on: May 01, 2014, 05:15:16 PM »

Thanks Duncan, I thought I had all the videos available on youtube! This one showsa wealth of detail.
We are booked on next wednesdays ferry back to Spain,  so new updates should follow quickly after that. I must say I have missed the building these last couple of weeks.

hammer

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #91 on: May 01, 2014, 07:41:52 PM »

Unfortunately Leader's deck layout has been altered considerably, including a wheel instead of the original tiller. A great gang who maintain her, in the winter they meet on board every Tuesday. I was lucky enough to have a tour last year, a day before she broke the topmast in a gale. I was out in a replica Bristol Channel Pilot Cutter at the same time.  I will admit I was a little sick, 16 hours Brixham to Southampton not bad for a gaffer.   
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Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #92 on: May 16, 2014, 12:26:37 PM »

 Iím back with an update, but first a photo, p70. This is how I hate to work! God knows how I managed to get in such a mess and this was how I left it before the UK trip. I am such a stickler for neatness whilst working bordering on the obsessive/compulsive! Iím at a loss to explain how I got in such a state, never again!
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #93 on: May 16, 2014, 12:28:19 PM »

 So I am back and working out of sequence once more. I have made up the deadeyes p71 is self-explanatory really. I took some copper wire, in this case is was the earth (ground for the American readers) from some 1mm twin and earth cable. For a reason I donít know, the earth  is always slightly less diameter in these applications, but just the right diameter for me. As you can see I wrapped it around the deadeyes then trimmed to length. Once done each was soft soldered to the chainplates already installed on the hull. I chose to soft solder because these are not going to take any great strain in my usage, it will sail occasionally but for the most part sit on a shelf in the lounge. Also installed are the forward cavil rails just needing the addition of belaying pins. Nothing to these except lengths of oak shaped so they were correct. These are in photoís p72 and p72a, you can also see the deadeyes and the windlass and winch.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #94 on: May 16, 2014, 12:31:02 PM »

 P73 is the blank for the bowsprit, one end of a length of 10mm dowel trimmed down to 8mm and then four pieces of pine glued to them to form a square end to the round dowel. This was then mounted in the trusty hand lathe (electric drill) and sanded down to final size of 8mm tapering to 7mm. Why the glued on pine when the final size would be 8mm? Well if you were to square off a piece of 8mm round, your finished squared part would be closer to 6mm, in other words your square section would be smaller than the round section, My way give you a little extra stock to work with, this can be seen in  p74 as the two differing grain patterns show easily.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #95 on: May 16, 2014, 12:33:52 PM »

 Every boat needs a crew and these smacks were known as five man boats along the Humber (not sure of other areas) technically this was four men and a boy, sometimes the son of the captain, more often than not a lad from a local workhouse as young as eleven! Anyway without resorting to O gauge railway figures which are extortionately expensive, while in the UK and in a model shop they did some cheap figures (1/48th) However all that came close were these in p75, a box of Africa Korp germans.
 Ridiculous you may say, but p76 shows one before and after figure I have started work on. Gone is the weaponry, off with an arm to reposition it, shave the head down to eventually form a souíwester. He is well on the way to becoming the tillerman

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #96 on: May 16, 2014, 12:35:58 PM »

 Back to the ship- p77 are the forward roller fairleads. The timberwork is simple to construct, I donít think they need further explanation except to say that the brass rollers were commercial items purchased from Modelling Timbers along with brass belaying pins. P78 is in their finished state of black paint.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #97 on: May 16, 2014, 12:38:06 PM »

  Hereís a failure! P79 are some nice fine wood shavings from my plane. I had read of a way to form mast hoops, take the shaving and form them around the correct diameter rod, in my case I found it easier to soak them in water first. Smear them with glue and wrap them around the rod then put aside to dry. Twenty four hours later some nicely formed laminated wooden tubes! However on cutting to the correct thickness on the bandsaw, the resulting hoops p80 and p81 were obviously too week to take any strain that may be passed through them on sailing. They were strong but deformed easily, so back to the drawing board for the mast hoops.
 

Brian60

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #98 on: May 16, 2014, 12:39:28 PM »

 Lastly hereís another problem, p82 shows my access hatch, it has failed to follow the contour of the deck and stands slightly proud and so not even remotely waterproof! In the next instalment I hope to show my solution- if it works.
 

dlancast

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Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
« Reply #99 on: May 16, 2014, 05:18:41 PM »

Nice work Brian. I love your approach to this project and the realizm you are bringing into it.  Great fun and looking forward to the finals and sailing.  Wish I could buy your MG, but them days are gone... used to own a 69 MGB/GT right out of military service.... great fun.


Take care,


Dennis
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