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Author Topic: Our First Build - Billings Banckert 516  (Read 8644 times)

Phil22

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Re: Our First Build - Billings Banckert 516
« Reply #50 on: October 09, 2019, 01:30:33 PM »


Overall results




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Phil22

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Re: Our First Build - Billings Banckert 516
« Reply #51 on: October 13, 2019, 11:11:12 AM »

The epoxy approach when putting together the railing sections has proved much easier for us than using solder.

For our build we wanted something a little unique, we extended the rear cabin a touch to create a (theoretical) platform to access to the funnel mounted ladder.













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Phil22

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Re: Our First Build - Billings Banckert 516
« Reply #52 on: October 13, 2019, 11:27:04 AM »


A couple more of the brass details




Radar and guard

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Phil22

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Re: Our First Build - Billings Banckert 516
« Reply #53 on: October 24, 2019, 07:22:41 AM »

Hey MBM,

For those interested. A colour version of the Banckert 516 build instructions can be downloaded here:

https://www.billingboatsusa.com/experienced/42-516-banckert.html

Size: 874 kb
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Phil22

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Re: Our First Build - Billings Banckert 516
« Reply #54 on: October 27, 2019, 10:25:38 AM »

Steady work on the handrails has continued over this past week. They’re almost done bar buttoning up a few small areas.  Daunting at first, but with thought and some trial and error we are happy with the results for a first effort.  We’ve picked up a few new skills and tips along the way ; )


Port and starboard handrails from the deck to the bridge








A cutting mat provides a great visual aid when putting bends in the required spots





The ladder is supported by a small piece of ply under the top step - helpful during mockup as for each rail there is only one point of contact at the stanchion





As not to have open joints on the stanchions these extra details were fitted





The full set of brass parts





The instructions have the rails of this section (left side) going into the rear cabin wall. For ease of fitting and for something different we made them this way (right side - pre-trimmed 'P' shaped part)





--










The intention so far was to go with a brushless motor (like this: https://hobbyking.com/en_us/turnigy-aerodrive-dst-700-brushless-outrunner-motor-700kv.html?___store=en_us) but I’ve since read that brushless struggle a bit a low revs. Would a brushed motor be more suited for this build?


Thanks for reading and any information shared.
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Subculture

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Re: Our First Build - Billings Banckert 516
« Reply #55 on: October 27, 2019, 10:50:20 AM »

I’ve since read that brushless struggle a bit a low revs. Not wishing to build a speed-tug, would a brushed motor be more suited for this build?

They're referring to cogging at very low rpm, which applies to sensorless set-ups. This is pretty much eliminated on modern brushless esc's.

On a boat this makes little to no difference, as the prop is essentially a fluid clutch e.g. it slips. Cogging can cause issues on model cars that like to run slow e.g. rock crawlers, where lots of torque is required and lots of sensitivity at low throttle settings.

In short I wouldn't let it concern you.

Phil22

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Re: Our First Build - Billings Banckert 516
« Reply #56 on: October 27, 2019, 11:05:26 AM »

Hey Subculture

Thank you as always for the helpful clarification and insight. We'll be getting to grips with the electronic components in the near future as the structure nears completion.
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Mark T

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Re: Our First Build - Billings Banckert 516
« Reply #57 on: October 27, 2019, 02:05:03 PM »

There's some really nice work that the two of you have carried out there.  Its looking very nice indeed  :-))
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Subculture

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Re: Our First Build - Billings Banckert 516
« Reply #58 on: October 27, 2019, 02:37:58 PM »

Whilst on the subject of epoxy, I find a coat of epoxy resin on wooden parts, mixed with a little bit of talcum powder, seals and strengthens everything beautifully before priming. Once the epoxy is lightly cut back (the talcum powder is optional but helps the sanding), it seals and smooths the grain giving a smooth surface more like the plastic parts

JimG

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Re: Our First Build - Billings Banckert 516
« Reply #59 on: October 27, 2019, 08:44:01 PM »

Instead of talcum powder I use Microballoons, costs more but I find it sands better and gives a really good finish. (won't smell as good when sanding though)
Jim
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Subculture

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Re: Our First Build - Billings Banckert 516
« Reply #60 on: October 27, 2019, 09:32:12 PM »

I once used some microballoons as a substitute for fumed silica when thickening some epoxy to use as a gelcoat- that was an experiment, but a big mistake. When I was post finishing the mould I ended up with lots of tiny pock marks, which I believe were the microballoons so I only tend to use them for areas which won't be sanded back.

JimG

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Re: Our First Build - Billings Banckert 516
« Reply #61 on: October 28, 2019, 10:20:36 AM »

Sounds like you were using a lot more microballoons than I would use to seal and fill the surface of wood. Some of the earlier microballoons (especially the brown phenolic type) were larger than those available today (the white type seem to be very small) so could have lead to a pock marked surface. When I have used them to produce a sanding sealer only a small quantity was needed as they are there to fill the grain of the wood not to give a thick layer. When sanded I have not seen any pock marks on the surface, with the surface  ending up as smooth as styrene sheet.
Jim
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SailorGreg

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Re: Our First Build - Billings Banckert 516
« Reply #62 on: October 28, 2019, 07:09:50 PM »

I once used some microballoons as a substitute for fumed silica when thickening some epoxy to use as a gelcoat- that was an experiment, but a big mistake. When I was post finishing the mould I ended up with lots of tiny pock marks, which I believe were the microballoons so I only tend to use them for areas which won't be sanded back.
If you could see the pock marks with the naked eye then it was probably air bubbles in the mixture.  Microballoons are, as the name implies, very small indeed and you cannot distinguish them in the epoxy matrix.  However they do stiffen the mixture, which makes it a lot harder to get air bubbles out, so you need to be quite gentle mixing them in.  But they do make sanding so much easier, and with care and good luck you can get a baby's bum finish as witnessed by Jim.

Phil22

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Re: Our First Build - Billings Banckert 516
« Reply #63 on: October 29, 2019, 12:09:27 AM »

Any excess epoxy on the handrails easily came off with a scrape from a craft knife, while leaving the joint intact. There are 5 or 6 more details to go on for the rigging then its on to hull strengthening and prep for the electronics.

Thanks to all for your input on working with wood surfaces. Good info to know

;) ;) ;) ;) ;)
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Subculture

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Re: Our First Build - Billings Banckert 516
« Reply #64 on: October 29, 2019, 07:11:29 AM »

Wasn’t air. The little marks showed once I compounded the tools. Only the part of the tool which had the micro balloons showed the marks. On something that is going to be painted it’s no big deal, but this was a tool to mould from. It was still usable, but I made a mental note not to use microballoons for that purpose.

Phil22

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Re: Our First Build - Billings Banckert 516
« Reply #65 on: November 16, 2019, 03:44:21 PM »

Well, we thought the brass bits were all wrapped up. Not quite, but it’s okay as they’ve turned out to be real fun to make.

The last parts (watch this space….) are for the mast rigging. Puzzling on how best to attach the lines, a few ideas were tried out including creating various hooks and looping the wire back on itself. None of which looked particularly neat. Finally we settled on chopping up unused stanchions and soldering the trimmed hole sections to the ends.







To stop the nano-bits from moving about while soldering they where each threaded onto some spare wire then taped down like so.




They should hold well.







Lastly got an initial undercoat on and some surface leveling.


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