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Author Topic: New Oldie  (Read 681 times)

Nick-R

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New Oldie
« on: February 12, 2024, 08:11:28 pm »

So I am retired and in my dotage and have returned to a boyhood hobby of building model boats, having spent many years owning real boats where you tend to take the risk of sinking a bit more seriously!!  I have completed a Aeronaut Queen and am currently building my first plank on frame model, a Billings Nordkap. 


Things have changed a bit since I was last involved in radio control with single channel gear where you sent a sort of morse code to the boat to turn left or right or control speed.  If you wanted to get a boat up on the plane, diesel or glow plug motors were the only option.  No brushless motors, no lipos and proportional control of rudder or throttle needed a mortgage extension to be affordable.   Oh, and no fibreglass hulls!


Some of my old stuff would be worth a bob or two now if I had kept it (or rather the wife had not thrown it out!!!) - Taycol were the electric motor to have but their weight plus the lead acid battery required to power it for 20 minutes or so needed a large hull!


Anyway, I have completed planking my Nordkap and am now scratching my head about cladding the hull with lightweight fibreglass.  Do I try to do the whole hull at once or each side separately?  If it is done in say two hits how do you deal with where the two sheets of glass meet at the curvaceous stern?  Hmm???


Nick Robinson
Wemyss Bay
Scotland
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JimG

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Re: New Oldie
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2024, 12:15:48 pm »

Easiest to cover each side seperately. After the first side has hardened sand the edge down at the stern to feather it onto the wood. Then cover the second side overlapping onto the first layer at the stern.Then once the resin has fully hardened you can sand down the overlap at the stern to give a smooth surface. Best to use wet and dry paper used wet as normal sandpaper can become clogged with resin.
Jim
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Geoff

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Re: New Oldie
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2024, 12:26:19 pm »

Nick,


Firstly welcome back to the hobby! Okay in terms of fibre glassing your first step should be to sand the hull smooth and do any filling necessary then put a layer of resin on the bare hull and allow to dry. My favourite method for this is to us a small foam roller which you just throw away. You want as thin a coat as possible and avoid runs at all costs, otherwise you will need a file to get the surface smooth.


The purpose of this coat is to sink into the wood fibres so when you apply the tissue you don't get dry patched and poor adhesion. It may raise the fibres and you will need to sand that away after its cured.


Use fibreglass tissue and cut the pieces for both sides at the same time so they overlap a little, it won't show when you are finished.


With all fibreglassing there are some rules which should be considered:


- Its ok to mix the resin in a pot but you must then place it in a tray. An old baking tray works well - best to cover the tray in tin foil so its not ruined (and don't tell the wife!). If you leave it in the pot it will get hot as the resin and hardener react to the extent the pot can start smoking and the resin can go off in a few minutes. The reason for the tray is to reduce the heat transfer and gives you much longer to work.


- The temperature of the room is important as you need to be at about 17 centigrade for all to work. If hotter it will set faster, if colder it will take ages to set and can remain sticky on the surface - this is called waxing and is impossible to sand off but if you wash in warm soapy water it will remove the wax.


- There are generally two types of resin, cellulose and epoxy. Cellulose stinks like you won't believe but epoxy is very mild.


- When you start to lay the cloth or tissue start in the middle of the hull doing both sides at the same time to avoid distortion when it dries. Roller forwards and backwards and again you want as thin a coat as possible such the grain shows through., Slightly overlap the next pieces and continue until the hull is done. Basically get stuck in and go for it as you have limited time before the resin starts to set, don't be bashful.


- once all dry sand to key the surface and add more cloth or tissue and/or just put 3 or 4 coats of resin on to builds up a layer which means you can get stuck in with the wet and dry, it gives you something to sand.


- Its not that hard but do have all the tools you need ready to hand because the clock is ticking from the moment you mix up the resin and hardener.




Its not actually that hard to do provided you follow the basics, remember too hot and the resin dries in minutes, too cold and it may take ages to dry and we are talking days and weeks and avoid runs at all costs.


Hope this may assist


Cheers


Geoff






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Shipmate60

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Re: New Oldie
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2024, 03:38:11 pm »

Nick,
There are 2 good Model Boat Clubs near you, Greenock and Largs.
Might be worth a trip to the Dam in Greenock or Largs boat pond for a chat.


Bob
Ex Wemms Bay resident and ex member of both model boat clubs.
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JimG

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Re: New Oldie
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2024, 08:15:50 pm »

Just some points from Geoff's post. Gllassfibre resin is polyester not cellulose, it does have a very strong smell  so needs good ventilation, really needs acetone to clean up afterwards. Epoxy is in my opinion easier to use, with polyester you can easily add too much hardener so it hardens too quickly producing a lot of heat . Epoxy is two parts with most modelling resins measured by volume and has virtually no smell. Glass cloth is better than tissue as it is more flexible and shapes to the hull better, also tissue is really only for polyester resin due to the bonding agent holding the chopped strand fibres together. Also resin does not actually dry , it is a chemical reaction changeing 2 liquids to a solid, normally not hardening is a sign of bad resin or not using the correct proportions when mixing.
Jim
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Nick-R

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Re: New Oldie
« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2024, 03:00:06 pm »

Thanks to all for replies.  I have gone for Eze-Kote rather than traditional resin/hardener. I have not tackled the exterior of the hull yet but have given the interior a couple of coats and it has sealed the wood quite nicely.  I only pinned the deck in place to ensure proper alignment of frames so this was easily removed to give access for sealing and fitting radio kit.  I also want to do flotation tests and get required ballast fixed on place before fixing the deck.


I have filled and sanded the hull using Model Lite and am ready to get on with cladding. Eze-Kote is ultra easy to use, more or less odour free and cleans up using water.  It dries to waterproof and apparently works well with lightweight glass cloth if you tube is to be believed!  Anyway, this is a first go at this so will keep you posted.
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Colin Bishop

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Re: New Oldie
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2024, 03:21:34 pm »

I used Eze Kote on my SLEC Fairey Swordsman kit and it worked fine with 1 oz glass cloth. You need 2-3 coats to fill the weave but they can be put on in less time than epoxy finishing resin takes to cure. It sands down beatifully and you can add more coats if needed. The resulting surface is not as tough as epoxy resin but when painted it is perfectly OK for a medium size scale boat.

Colin

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Nick-R

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Re: New Oldie
« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2024, 04:35:22 pm »

Out of curiosity, did you fix the spray rails before or after glass fibre?
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Colin Bishop

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Re: New Oldie
« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2024, 05:17:32 pm »

The chine and sprayrails were fitted after applying the glassfibre. They were lightly pinned and taped in position and thin superglue run along the joint.

Colin
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Nick-R

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Re: New Oldie
« Reply #9 on: February 14, 2024, 05:44:22 pm »

Thanks for that.  That was what I was planning for the rubbing strakes on Nordkap.
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Colin Bishop

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Re: New Oldie
« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2024, 05:47:11 pm »

On my latest model, a Greek fishing boat, I have used Deluxe Superphatic in place of superglue very successfully.

Colin
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Nick-R

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Re: New Oldie
« Reply #11 on: February 15, 2024, 08:42:16 pm »

So first ever attempts at:
1) Planked hull
2) Fibre glass cladding


Itís a bit rough round the edges and maybe I should have put a bit more into prepping the hull but I am relatively pleased with the result.  A few more coats of Eze-Kote to come now then onto painting the hull. 
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